Why A Style Coach?

We have all met someone in life who has a sense of style. Their appearance, is in harmony with their body shape, height and natural colouring, as well as personality and character. They are fluent in the language of dressing and look good whatever the budget!

But why does getting dressed seem so easy for some, and a daily chore for others. And does it even matter?

The clothes you wear, do not define you as a person, but they are a reflection of your attitude and how you feel about yourself.
When it comes to non-verbal communication, clothing is responsible for the majority of our first impressions. It displays our economic status, social circle, level of sophistication, morality and mood.

Social media, TV and advertisting bombard us with thousands of images of what we should look like, and not what the majority of us do. Women are predisposed to feeling more inadequate and tend to underestimate their attractiveness. If you lack in confidence and self-esteem, these images only reinforce poor body confidence.

Experiences such as divorce, illness or bereavement can leave us on the back foot with a lack of the feel-good factor we once had. And a busy family life leaves little me time.

If you look good, you feel good. Who doesn’t want to feel more confident, happy and youthful!

Many women dress older than they are or wear clothes larger than their actual size. Trying to disguise any perceived flaws often highlights them more. We stop wearing things that don’t make us feel good, without knowing why. Trust your instinct and learn to like what you see in the mirror.

Colour is an instant way to make yourself feel and look better.
The right colours can give a youthful glow while the wrong colours can be ageing.
We are all born with either a cool (blue) undertone or a warm (yellow) undertone to our skin. Knowing this will establish the best colours to wear next to your face or the body as a whole.
Cool skin tones can wear blue, red, green and berry shades while warm skin tones can wear burnt orange, rose, blues and golden shades.

Hiring a professional style coach allows for an unbiased viewpoint. It eliminates emotion and other expectations that may arise in the hands of well meaning friends or relatives. Being friendly and non-judgemental also play a big part in building a relationship of trust.

The job of a style coach is to help steer you away from old, repeated negative responses and replace them with a new focus.

The focus on finding the best styles for your body shape, colours that flatter your natural colouring and give you a youthful glow, aswell as tricks and accessories to highlight your best features.

Almost everyone I work with say ‘I wish I had done this earlier’ Next time you open your wardrobe, get dressed or go shopping, think about the value you place on yourself and how it reflects the best of you from the inside, out.

Tips to finding your style
• Create a vision board on Pinterest and find styles you’d like to try out
• Consider your best assets and find ways to highlight them
• If something looks, fits and feels good. Ignore the dress size.
• Choose a monochrome colour pallette to give a streamlined look.
• Use bold prints and accessories to confuse the eye over a larger frame
• Walk tall and sit straight- It makes clothes look better, and creates presence and poise!

www.rachel-moss.com
Tel +44 (0) 79890 77603
rachel@rachel-moss.com

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Colour Your Life!

Wearing the right colours for your skin hair and eyes can enhance your natural colouring and bring your features alive as well as visually reducing blemishes, clean up the complexion and give you a more youthful appearance and who doesn’t want a bit of that!

Wearing colours that don’t work for you can create an appearance and complexion that is ageing or hard. It could be said that wearing the wrong colours can mis-represent who you are, even how you feel.

How To Establish Your Skin Tone-

We are all born with either a BLUE (cool) undertone in our skin or a more YELLOW (warm) undertone and it is from this that we can establish the most flattering colours to wear, next to the face or as a complete look

 

Take the test-
Take a look at the inside of your wrist or forearm to see if the skin has a blue tint (indicating a cool undertone) to it or a yellow-green (indicating a warm undertone)

Or this-
1. Take off any traces of makeup and look into the natural daylight with a hand-held mirror

2. Wear a white shirt or hold a piece of white paper to your face.

3. If your skin tone in contrast to the white looks YELLOW or a warm golden, then you have WARM undertones to your skin which means you will look best wearing warmer colours.

4. If your face looks BLUE to pinkish, your skin tone is COOL which means you will look best wearing cooler colours

5. If your skin is a mix of blue and green you have a NEUTRAL skin tone which means you can wear a mixture of both warm and cool colours!

6.You can also do the same with GOLD or SILVER fabric. Gold being great for warm skin tones and Silver for cool.

 

WARM undertone

YOUR HAIR coloring will be- coppery brown, dark brown, chestnut or dark golden blond, red, dark or light auburn.

Your eyes will be- hazel, pale green or blue.

Your complexion will be- golden brown, yellow beige, peach or ivory. you may have freckles & tan easily

WARM colour suggestions- Bronze, burnt orange, red, yellows, rose, brown, blues and golden shades.

 

COOL undertone

Your hair coloring will be-black, dark brown, brunette, ash blonde silver grey or white

Your eyes will be- dark brown, green, hazel or dark blue

Your complexion will be- black, olive, fair, rosy or pale and your skin often burns in the sun

COOL colour suggestions- Purples, red, dark green, plum, ruby, royal blue, teal, black, aubergine

 

Book a colour analysis in the comfort of your own home and find the best colours to wear against your face, in clothing, accessories and makeup. Find out how colour can be used to impact your work and personal life!

 

See What People Say!

Schedule An Appointment!

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Happy New You!

I recently met up for breakfast with my brother in my home town of Okehampton, West Devon. We met in The White Hart hotel, a 17th century coaching inn, now converted into a J D Wetherspoon pub and hotel.

The buildings history is tastefully honoured with a decent collection of nostalgic photos and paintings including the town and surrounding area. We were trying to pinpoint the year of a particular black and white street scene of Okehampton when I saw a lady in the foreground of the picture.

She was wearing a white buttoned up three quarter length dress, a neat collar and short capped sleeves with a fitted waist and a pattern around the hem. A pair of cream courts, a matching bag and her hair was styled in a neat flipped bob.

I shouted out ‘‘It’s the 60’s’’ like a crazed pub quizzer.

And then we saw the date. 1960.

What struck me, is that it took a dress and a particular time in fashion to pinpoint the age of the photo. Not from looking at the cars, buses or buildings, but a simple cotton dress.

Whether you were born during these times or not, most of us recognise something from the fashion eras of the 1940’s, 50’s, 60’s and 70’s and many of us will have a favourite style from those times. Any one of these eras is always a great excuse for a fancy-dress party too!

The styles of these times stood out not only for their individuality, but were clear signposts and maps to what was happening socially and politically in the country and around the world.

The wartime rationing of food and clothing in the 1940’s literally forced fashion into slimmer silhouettes using cheaper and less material. Tights and stockings would be a thing of the past as women learnt to ‘draw’ on their back seams or go without.

This all changed with the end of war in 1947. Christian Dior showed 90 creations to an audience in Paris. The skirts and dresses used huge amounts of material with equal quantities of netting underneath. It was the famous Bar jacket and full pleated skirt that epitomised what was coined The New Look. It marked the end of rationing and the doom and gloom of war and gave way to a booming time in fashion as well as in dance and music.

Fashion nowadays is a massed produced affair and there are few ‘stand-out’ moments when a new fashion season comes around and lets face it, there are only so many ways you can design another cotton t-shirt.

With charity shops in almost every town and city in the UK, it is not hard to pick up a bargain and a a complete outfit while supporting a charity or two and you will often find original pieces from way-back-when.

On top of that, you are helping to recycle the burgeoning clothes mountain we already have.

Would you like a new look?

Are you are overwhelmed or lost in the fashion jungle? Then get in touch with me today and find out how you can update your style, wardrobe and image in three easy steps!

Wishing you all a very happy, healthy and stylish 2018!

Clem Onojeghuo

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Celebrating 50!

If you are on Facebook, and depending on your interests, the chances that you belong to a group or two, is fairly likely.

Earlier this year, I joined the group UK Makeup Addicts. I wouldn’t exactly call myself a makeup addict, but prefer to keep an interest in, and an eye out on what people are doing with their new purchases in an industry now worth 4 billion a year in the UK.

UK makeup addicts have over 50,000 members and it is fair to say, the majority of the group are in their early twenties to thirties. Every now and again, someone the other side of forty will pop up, and it is these occasions that keep me going.

As a teenager, living in the rural countryside of South West England, the only makeup I could get my 1980’s hands on, was a range in the local Spar called Cover Girl, endorsed by US model Cheryl Tiegs. I loved the packaging with her expensive hair, perfect teeth and firm skin and in my naivety, I believed that if I bought the highly-perfumed compact powder and mascara, that I would (totes) look like her- Needless to say, It didn’t happen.

Makeup brands that were big in my time were Miners, Rimmel, Max Factor, Maybelline, Almay and Avon and like most teenagers, I experimented with makeup.

Photo Trude Bosence

I would constantly pick the wrong colour of foundation or powder. Starting off with deep orange, (with accompanying tide-marks) progressing to pale beige and eventually ending up with my perfect match. mortuary white. (not its specific name, but looking at old photos, I can only describe it as goth horror)

Meanwhile, my sister was being lavish with her pink miners cream blush and doing a fine impression of Ziggy Stardust. This along with her self-made mullet (she was at art school, so it was fine) was just about the icing on the cake.

I had no clue about skincare or the first thing about how to apply makeup. The only brushes I had at the time, came with the compacts and they disintegrated after a few uses.

The choice of products were minimal compared with today. On-line shopping, YouTube tutorials and celebrity make-up artists didn’t exist and high definition foundation was another 25 years off.

One afternoon while I was perusing through the makeup group, I saw a woman around my age pop up. Enter Trude Bosence. A vivacious 53 year old makeup artist, hair stylist, stylist and photographer from North Devon. Trude asked everyone what they thought of her photo and fingers on buzzers, I was straight in there with ‘you look great’ (which she did) and with a relief I can’t express, at seeing someone my age posting a photo of herself.

 

Trude Bosence

Within a short space of time Trude and I hit it off, and spontaneously agreed to do a photoshoot a week later.

As a former model, I know the pressures on the makeup artist, stylist and photographer and although photo shoots can be fun, they can also come with a few time constraints. There is no time left to get creative.

Doing a shoot with Trude would have none of these restrictions. For either of us. There was no agenda, goal, deadline, or pre-conceived ideas. This along with her super friendly and relaxed attitude would make it a load of fun!

Trude’s pink flamingo studio was ultimate. The main part of her studio was taken up with a selection of props, backdrops, and lighting equipment, while a well designed end section was her dedicated makeup bar. This says nothing for her incredibly well stocked rail of clothes (many are vintage) along with a good selection of shoes, wigs and accessories. A one-stop shop for a complete head-to-toe makeover!

Trude in her pink flamingo dressing room

As well as meeting and making a new friend in Trude, I watched us working together and it got me thinking about what 50 means to me.

Reaching 50 is definitely one of those milestones everyone talks about, but it is more than the sum of its parts.

Reaching 50 is about taking opportunities and invites as they come your way. You never know where they might lead, the people you meet or the new things you will learn.

It is about trusting and using your instincts, intuition and perceptions. They won’t let you down, as long as you use them.

It is about not taking yourself too seriously, being spontaneous and laughing as much as possible!

It is surrounding yourself with kind, positive and authentic people. The kind who help you grow and who reflect the same qualities and values in life while telling you the truth.

”No” is a complete sentence- It is about saying yes when you mean yes, and no when you mean no.

Reaching 50 is about owning and loving every part of who you are, and who you have become and about being unequivocably comfortable in your own skin.

Every now and again Trude and I would laugh loud and raucously in the shoot-

We’ll show them how its done”

Trude, I think we did!

 

If you have lost your confidence, fizz, style and self, somewhere in the maze of life, then get in touch for a free consultation and discover how a colour analysis, wardrobe plan or personal shopping trip will help to boost your confidence and give you a fresh start. You will wish you had done it sooner!

Contact Trude Bosence for information on her photoshoots via her Facebook page.

Photo Trude Bosence

Photo Trude Bosence

Photo Trude Bosence

 

Rachel and Trude- It’s a wrap!

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New Look

Lia Edwards is a Munich based portrait photographer originally from the UK. She discovered her passion for photography in 2001 while living in Sydney Australia. Read more about Lia’s work here.

Luckily for the rest of us, Lia moved to Munich in 2011. We met shortly after at a creative group meet up. She showed me a copy of a beautiful retro style photo she had taken, and I was hooked.

liavintage Kopie

Lia was the perfect choice for me to update my photos for a model agency in Munich and we have worked together on several occasions. (see photos below)

This year we created a further collaboration with our styling and photography packages. If you want the full works from makeup, wardrobe, styling and photography then talk to us for a consultation.

What makes a good photograph?

One of the most important things when you are being photographed, is to feel relaxed. We have approximately forty three muscles in our face and use the large majority of them when we laugh (even more when we frown) If you are tense, it will show in your face and body and no amount of editing will hide the fact.

Plan your photo shoot with your photographer around a day when you know you have time to get ready and have little stress as possible. Book baby sitters if you need to and think how you want to look and what you are going to wear.

Whether it is a romantic couple shoot, family gathering or head shots. Choose your clothes with care. If you are in a family portrait, think about a theme. Wearing bold colours on a dull day can create vibrant happy portraits (Lia will discuss this with you)

If they are portraits, your photos need to be something you are happy with looking at for a long time. If they are for business, an actor or model they need to get you noticed and working for you from the get go.

20141011-09(watermarked)The shot above was spotted by Mrs Robinson agency.

Even if you are experienced at having your photos taken, the first few frames of a shoot are usually a good warm-up exercise and an opportunity to get to know each other and break the ice.

As the session continues, you will feel less self-conscious. It will be these photos that you look at and share the most because they will reflect you at your most natural and relaxed.

20141011-04(watermarked)

Hair and Make-up

For natural photographs, it is best to stick to your usual hairstyle and not to try anything too radical. The same goes for makeup. If you don’t usually wear much make-up, its best to avoid hitting the makeup counter at the last minute for a look that you wouldn’t normally go for. The chances are, you will not be happy and the makeup (which is invariably applied under bad store lighting) will not transfer well to natural daylight or studio shots.

If you need help with how to apply makeup and want to discuss a LOOK that flatters your natural colouring and features contact me!

20141011-06(watermarked)

What makes a good photographer?

The job of a photographer is not always easy. communicator, director, stylist, (sometimes gymnast!) being able to encourage and coax and give a few concise orders in order to get the best shot and a happy customer.

Ultimately, their job is to bring out something special in your personality and character and find a way of capturing it. Good results are based on creating confidence, trust, communication and having fun working together in order to achieve the same goal.

20141011-02(watermarked)

Memorable photography is an alchemy of everything coming together. Photographer, subject, lighting, chance moments and a desire to be part of a creative process.

Lia knows how to do this, while her returning customers and word-of-mouth serve as testament.

Note: To achieve my quick change looks, I used: 1 black dress, grey skirt, red cardigan, white blouse, blue jacket, high heels, sunglasses & a magazine.

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Behind the Scenes

It was a great end to the month of July, working with Munich based portrait Photographer Lia Edwards on a styling and photographic session for a new client. 

A few weeks before the shoot, Margareta checked in for a wardrobe session with me. As owner of MMH life coaching, Margareta wanted a more International look to reflect her business.

First off, we established anything outdated in Margareta’s wardrobe and got rid of things that no longer fit or were tired and worn. At the same time, I looked for the best cut and colours to complement her figure and natural colouring.

Next, we set a date for Personal Shopping. A list of key items was created in order to fill out any gaps in the wardrobe. Margareta had fun discovering selected pieces that added volume, as well as value to her existing wardrobe.

Liabehindthescenes

All that remained, was for hair and makeup and to get ready for the shoot!

As a model on clothing and photographic shoots I have first hand the experience on what is needed for getting the best results. In this work, the devil is (always) in the detail!

Having personally booked Lia for a photoshoot of my own, I was struck by the energy and quality of her work- It seemed a natural step for us to collaborate!

If you are looking to re-brand your business; update your website or simply for a fresh new look! Talk to us today and experience a professional but fun photo shoot with photos that everyone will be talking about!

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